Tuesday, 16 January 2018

Surnames A-Z: D

A 2017 Facebook meme had people listing their their mother's maiden name, father's surname, maternal and paternal grandparents' surnames, and sometimes even a few more generations back. By any norms, a bit too much information in this cyber age. 

Just think how many security questions ask for your mother's maiden name. And let's not even get into having that information on your Facebook wall, especially if you have your settings set to public (instead of friends only). You don't do that, do you? 


In a series of posts, I'm listing my direct ancestors' surnames, starting with "A" and going through to "Y" -- I have no direct or indirect "Z" ancestors. So far. 


We may share a surname, but this doesn't necessarily mean we're related, but if you think we are, please contact me using the email link on the right side of this blog.


My "D" surnames:


  • Daggett
  • Davidson
  • Davis
  • Day
  • Dewey
  • Diamond
  • Doane
  • Dodds
  • Doggett
  • Donovan
  • Dougherty
  • Dumble
  • Durant
The never ending story continues.....








© Margaret Dougherty 2016-2018 All rights reserved

Monday, 15 January 2018

Found: maternal 3rd great grandparents in the Scottish Highlands

A few months ago, I had a bit of a brickwall smash with my great grandfather Frank Gillanders Matheson, when I discovered that Gillanders was Frank's middle name. Today, I revisited his parents' names on Scotland's People. And what great finds I made!

I had my maternal 2nd great grandparents' names, Donald Matheson and Margaret McKenzie, thanks to finds my mother had made many years ago. I knew, thanks to Frank's 1866 first marriage to Isabella McKenzie (no doubt a cousin), that both his parents were deceased at the time of that marriage. But I had no other information. Because all of Donald and Margaret's children were born and baptized in Urray, Ross and Cromarty, I've made assumptions that they too were born there. That may not necessarily be the case.

Starting first with Margaret McKenzie, after discarding adding a county in my search parameters I quickly her 1865 death registration, with the added bonus of her age and father's name (John McKenzie). My grandfather John Matheson was named after his great grandfather, John McKenzie, who was a labourer. Margaret's mother's name is also listed, but the first name (also Margaret) is crossed out, so that must be confirmed. Oh, and Margaret's mother's maiden name was also McKenzie. Margaret died at East Grange, Kinloss in Elgin. A new place name to add to my research arsenal. Kinloss is very near Forres, where I have some ancestral roots on my Ross side.

My 3rd great grandmother was just 67 years old when she died, yet her cause of death is listed as "infirmities of old age". Today, 67 is hardly considered old age, but their lives were so very much harder then, compared to ours in the 21st century.

Next, I looked for the death registration of Margaret's husband, Donald. Her death registration helpfully noted that Donald was already deceased in 1865, narrowing my search window, and confirmed that he was a farm grieve, which is listed in Frank's marriage and death registrations. Bingo! I found Donald, a farm grieve in 1859, having died in Lochalsh, in Ross-shire--another new place name to add to my research arsenal. The exact place name in Lochalsh is indecipherable to me right now. I'll be consulting with some of my Scottish DNA cousins on that. Donald's death registration tells me that his parents were Dugald Matheson, whose occupation was mason, and Isabella Gillanders. I knew that the Gillanders name would open doors. Unfortunately, Donald's cause of death is blank on the registration form.

Genealogy discoveries like these do make my heart sing.

Will these new finds help to have more DNA matches? That would be fantastic.

My search for information about Dugald and Isabella and John and his wife will be harder now, as it is hard to find Scottish records from the 1700s. I'll keep looking though. My glass is half full.

As always, the never ending story continues.....




© Margaret Dougherty 2016-2018 All rights reserved

Tuesday, 9 January 2018

The final years of Rose Caroline Dougherty 1839-1915

It can't be said often enough. The wealth of information in digitized old newspapers is at times overwhelming and always absorbing. Thanks to the amazing effort of the BaNQ to digitize the thousands of newspapers in its collection, I and many other genealogists have been spending an inordinate amount of time sleuthing for information about our Quebec ancestors.

Yesterday's efforts produced several Sherbrooke Daily Record items about my great grandmother Rose Caroline Dougherty (1839-1915) and her final years. Until now, the only newspaper reference I had was a two-line item in the Waterloo Advertiser (near Sherbrooke) in March 1915 noting her passing.

Sherbrooke today is a drive of under 90 minutes from Montreal, in the heart of the Eastern Townships. Rosie and Joe made their home here following their marriage, and if not living in Sherbrooke proper, they were very near throughout their marriage. I imagine that trains ran between Sherbrooke and Montreal.

Rose's husband, my great grandfather, John James Dougherty, died in his 60th year, in 1893 in Sherbrooke, when my grandfather Joe was just 13 years old. I've not yet found a detailed obit of my great grandfather's passing (the Sherbrooke Daily Record only began publishing in 1897), but I hope to one day find some record of his life. In any case, he left Rose enough money so that my grandfather's education was financed. The story goes that Joe spent some of his high school years at a Massachusetts school. This is bolstered by the 1901 census, when Rose was listed as living alone in Sherbrooke. He later attended McGill University, studying electrical engineering in the Faculty of Science. Quebec university tuition today remains the lowest in all of Canada. I don't know what it was in the early 1900s, but expect that it was no small achievement that Rose was able to send her son to McGill.

Esplanade Ave, Montreal
Rose is living with my grandparents in Montreal at the time of the 1911 census in a flat on the top floor of a triplex on Esplanade. Yes, there's someone named William listed as my grandfather's brother, but my grandfather was an only child. The mystery of who this William is--likely a distant cousin--remains unresolved. By 1913, Rose's health is failing. If anything, walking up two long flights of stairs (one indoor, one outdoor) to get into the flat would certainly have been a challenge for anyone in their 70s, as she then was.

1911 Canada Census







I found the first reference to Rose in the Sherbrooke Daily Record on  9 Oct 1913.
Sherbrooke Daily Record 9 Oct 1913

Soon after Christmas that same year, Rosie's health took a turn for the worse.

Sherbrooke Daily Record 29 Dec 1913

But Rosie rallied, and ten days later, this:

Sherbrooke Daily Record 7 Jan 1914

After that, I find nothing about Rose and her life in Sherbrooke, until the first report of her death:

Sherbrooke Daily Record 8 Mar 1915
This was followed two days later by a wonderful obituary that contains details of Rosie's life, and of her funeral.

Sherbrooke Daily Record 10 Mar 1915, 1 of 3
Sherbrooke Daily Record 10 Mar 1915, 2 of 3

Sherbrooke Daily Record 10 Mar 1915, 3 of 3
The details in this report are truly gifts. Aside from the varying spelling of Dougherty (which my family uses) and Doherty (used by Judge Marcus and his family), we get a sense of the very kind woman that was Rosie. We get confirmation that my grandfather was a cousin of Judge Marcus. We learn that Rosie was a nurse in her later years (she was a teacher before her 1876 marriage). 

Rosie's burial is recorded in the register of St Patrick's Parish in Sherbrooke: 

St Patrick's Parish Register, Sherbrooke, Quebec, 1915

The funeral soloist mentioned in the newspaper report, Margaret Doherty, is the granddaughter of James J. Doherty and Margaret Anderson, who were the sponsors at my grandfather's 3 Dec 1879 baptism. I'm still trying to proof a family relationship between my Doughertys and this Doherty family. 

According to her obituary, Rosie had suffered a stroke and related paralysis. What we don't know is whether this stroke had been suffered before she returned to Sherbrooke in 1913, which it is already known she was in failing health, or did this happen afterwards in Sherbrooke? 

Nineteenth century and early 20th century obituaries were full of details. I love them. 

The never ending story continues....




© Margaret Dougherty 2016-2018 All rights reserved

When Dungiven came to be in Derry

A bit of a history clarification with this post. A back and forth debate among DNA cousins has been definitively resolved. I grew up (and it seems so too did many Dougherty cousins of many branches) being told that our forebears came from Donegal. In fact, some grave markers in Canada and the U.S. even note ancestors were born in Donegal.

It's been long established that my 3rd great grandparents, James Dougherty and Isabella McLaughlin, were almost certainly born in Inishowen, which has always been in Donegal. But my their son, Marcus (2nd great grandfather) and some of his siblings and many of their children were born in Banagher, Learmont and Dungiven. All of these places are today located in Derry (or Londonderry), Northern Ireland.

A 4th cousin again raised this issue in December, as did another 4th cousin a few days ago. That 4th cousin did some more research, and sent me this comment, after looking at sites that included this and this:
"Following the defeat of the Irish earls and the confiscation of their lands in 1609, English colonization was undertaken by livery companies of the City of London and the Honourable Irish Society (founded 1610). A charter of 1613, granted by James I of England, VI of Scotland, established the county of Londonderry, which comprised the old county, O’Neill lands of Loughinsholin, and small parts of Donegal and Antrim."
I'm very glad to have this resolved at last and have updated all references in my genealogy database to say Dungiven is in Derry, not Donegal. Yes, I'm saying Derry, rather than Londonderry.

The never ending story continues....




© Margaret Dougherty 2016-2018 All rights reserved

Tuesday, 2 January 2018

Stephen Hopkins and All Saints Church, Upper Clatford, Hampshire

Happy new year to all!

I first wrote about Stephen Hopkins (1581-1644), my 10th great grandfather (and my direct Mayflower ancestor), soon after I began this blog, here. Today, another genealogy blogger, Heather Wilkinson Rojo, has written a post on her blog, Nutfield Genealogy, in her series of Tombstone Tuesdays posts about the churchyard in Upper Clatford, Hampshire, England, Stephen's birthplace. But Heather's post includes photos, and so I decided to post a link to her excellent post here. While you're looking at these photos, be sure to click on the link to Heather's earlier post that gives more information about Stephen.

Here's my line of descent from Stephen Hopkins to my great grandmother, Charlotte Butler:

Stephen Hopkins m Mary Kent
Giles Hopkins m Katherine Weldon
Deborah Hopkins m Josiah Cooke
Deborah Cooke m Moses Godfrey
David Godfrey m Priscilla Baker
Jonathan Godfrey m Lucy Calkin 
Samuel Godfrey m Olive Webster
Margaret White Godfrey m John Waddell Fisher
Mary Olive Fisher m Samuel Butler
Charlotte Butler m Elias Nelson

The never ending story continues....



© Margaret Dougherty 2016-2018 All rights reserved

Saturday, 30 December 2017

Surnames A-Z: C

A Facebook meme in 2017 had people listing their their mother's maiden name, father's surname, maternal and paternal grandparents' surnames, and sometimes even a few more generations back.

It's a nice idea, but in today's 21st century age of cyber-security and privacy considerations, too much information is a bad thing. Just think how many security questions ask for your mother's maiden name. And let's not even get into having that information on your Facebook wall, especially if you have your settings set to public (instead of friends only). You don't do that, do you? 


Over the coming posts, I'll list my direct ancestors' surnames, starting with "A" and going through to "Y" -- I have no direct or indirect "Z" ancestors. So far. 


A tip of the hat to Lorine McGinnis Schulze who started this meme alternative with her own series over at her excellent genealogy blog. As Lorine points out, most surnames are more common than you think. We may share a surname, but doesn't mean we're related, but if you think we are, please contact me using the email link on the right side of this blog.


My "C" surnames:

  • Calkin
  • Caroline
  • Cathcart
  • (de) Chatellerault
  • (de) Chaworth
  • (de) Clare
  • Clarell
  • Clark
  • (de) Clavering
  • (de) Clifford
  • Codman
  • Coleman
  • Connor
  • (de) Courtenay
  • Cowe
  • Cowles
  • Craddock
  • Crosby
The never ending story continues....



© Margaret Dougherty 2016-2017 All rights reserved

Friday, 29 December 2017

And my all time top five posts are ....

I started this blog about 18 months ago, and while I haven't blogged as often as I want, I think I've blogged enough since then to take a stroll down memory lane. And so I give you my all time top five blog posts...so far....

And in the number one position, Solving origin mysteries: Robert James Cherry on 7 Dec 2017 with 256 page views. 


Credit where credit is due: the genealogy blogging community is relatively small, and my relatively new blog attracts only a small audience, compared to other more active and more well-known genealogy blogs. The hits on my top blog post are thanks to a social media link to it posted by a genealogy friend, who knows who she is (thanks again!).

I know there are more stories to tell in 2018.  As another blogger wrote recently, I freely admit to my posts being cousin bait. What's cousin bait, you ask? For the uninitiated, read all about it here. If you're a cousin of mine, I hope you enjoy these stories. Say hello, as others have done, and my warm thanks to those who've contacted me.

The never ending story continues.....



© Margaret Dougherty 2016-2017 All rights reserved

Thursday, 21 December 2017

Surnames A-Z: B


A relatively recent Facebook meme has people listing their their mother's maiden name, father's surname, maternal and paternal grandparents' surnames, and sometimes even a few more generations back.

It's a nice idea, but in today's 21st century age of cyber-security and privacy considerations, too much information is a bad thing. Just think how many security questions ask for your mother's maiden name. And let's not even get into having that information on your Facebook wall, especially if you have your settings set to public (instead of friends only). You don't do that, do you? 

Over the coming posts, I'll list my direct ancestors' surnames, starting with "A" and going through to "Y" -- I have no direct or indirect "Z" ancestors. So far. 

A tip of the hat to Lorine McGinnis Schulze who started this meme alternative with her own series over at her excellent genealogy blog. As Lorine points out, most surnames are more common than you think. We may share a surname, but doesn't mean we're related, but if you think we are, please contact me using the email link on the right side of this blog.

As I went to add my "B" names, I realized that many of my ancient Anglo-Normans first used the French "de" (or of) in front of what became their surnames. I've made an executive decision to include those surnames throughout the alphabet, and not all in "D".

My "B" surnames:
  • Baker
  • (de) Badlesmere
  • (de) Balliol
  • Bangs
  • Barber
  • Barter
  • Bassett
  • Bean
  • (de) Beauchamp
  • Beaufort
  • (de) Beaumont
  • Benjamin
  • Berenguer
  • (de) Berkeley
  • Birchard
  • Blackater
  • Bliss
  • Bower
  • Brabant
  • (de) Braose
  • Bridmore
  • (de) Brienne
  • (de) Brewire
  • Brotherton
  • Bruce
  • (de) Brus
  • Buell
  • (de) Burgh
  • Burr
  • Butler
The never ending story continues....


© Margaret Dougherty 2016-2017 All rights reserved